Friday, December 10, 2010

Here's The Plan ...

I'm going to hammer the PTs.  If I had scored 70s on both of my PTs this past exam, I would have passed.  The plan is to spend a month figuring those things out, then another month on my essays, then the remaining time on my MBEs. 

Good night, Irene.

22 comments:

Anonymous said...

That's a good plan, GP. I am pretty sure that it was because I scored really well on the PTs that I was able to pass. (I took the CBX 6x and passed in July 2009). I know that my essays weren't the strongest area so I really worked at making the PTs the best. Since your MBE scores seem pretty good, I think you have the formula for success this next time around. Good luck with everything. Rooting for you!

Anonymous said...

I think your approach is wrong. When it comes to the PTs, just follow the directions. Even if your analysis is wrong, you'll still score a 65 if you do what's asked. You can get yourself some good breathing room for the PTs by rocking the essays, i.e, 70-75. This appears to be your best shot at passing, assuming you have good MBE scores. You should do as many essays as you can possibly do. If your doing a review course you should do every essay they give you, twice. If you're not taking a review course, well then frankly you'll likely fail but improve your chances by downloading as many essays from the net as possible. Do a PT a week between now and the exam, that should expose you to every possible type of PT. Remember, read the instructions carefully. As far the MBEs, if you know the law sufficiently well to consistently score passing grades on the essays, you should know the law to pass MBEs. That's what worked for me. As I mentioned above, you will likely fail if you're not taking a review course. Not definitely, but likely. Good luck.

Anonymous said...

Good luck, think of the PTs as a fun project. I know that sounds counterintuitive, but trust me on this, they are 3 hours long, and whenever human beings have to do anything for an extended period of time they better be somewhat interested, lest they lose focus. Not that you did, just sayin'- try to stay involved with the 'fun' PTs youll be taking in the afternoons.
As to the essays and MBEs- while time pressure won't make them any fun- just do your best like you always do.
This time, not that you didn't before- have fun with the Bar experience, as much as possible that is, whilst stayin' focused, treatin' yourself well, and ultimately gettin that 1440.
In fact, have fun everyday- never dread studyin' or preparin' between now and then.
I know, I know, that sounds unconventional ridiculous and against the grain compared to everyone else-
but trust me on this one- you can do it by a slight adjustment- reimagination of what your energy is doin' daily- and no one, I guarantee will ever, ever question your abilities again.
Best wishes GP, we are with you!:)

Anonymous said...

GP,

In order not to carsh and burn for the 8th time, here is what you should consider doing:

1) Assure yourself a 60 day study plan between now and the exam.

2) Study for two 3-hour slots, just as you would on the actual exam.

3) Do not study on Christmas eve and Christmas day, or on New Year's eve and New Year's day, lastly, do not review any bar materials the day before the exam, as well as , during the actual exam.

4) Take a whole 2-hour to write a full essay, do 2 per day, for a total of 50 days, or 100 exams.

5) Take a whole 2-hour if need be to go through 20 MBE's daily, do that for 50 days, or 1000 total MBE's.

6) Take 6 hours to write a full PT per day, do that for 10 days, or complete 10 PT's before the bar.

LASTLY: DO NOT WASTE NOT A SECOND OF YOUR TIME, STUDYING ANY OUTLINES PERIOD. YOU WILL LEARN BY DOING, RATHER LEARN PASSIVELY BY READING ONLY.

RECAP: At the end of the 360 hours of preparation over 60 days, you would have completed 100 Essays, 1,000 MBE's and 10 PT's.

Good luck to you in February 2011.

Anonymous said...

Grand Poobah--I found your site when I was studying for the bar exam for July 2007. i did not pass my first time, but I passed the February 2008 bar exam. Two things I learned about studying for bar exam: (1) the exam really is easy if you know how to study for it and (2) do not get lost in the trees. I could not tell you what my score was the first time, because your score does not matter. How close you are does not matter. You either pass or fail. End of story.

I took barbri the first time I studied and hated it. The next time I thought long and hard as to how I should study. First approach, the second time around, I did not study for the MBE's until a week before the exam. I did not care about the MBE's. You either know the law or you don't. And that is going to reflect on you on the MBE's, essay, and performance test. KNOW THE LAW.

Here's what I did: I bought all the Emanuel law outlines. You know, the ones you use for studying in law school. Now, for each major topic, the book contains exam tips. The exam tips cover the issues the a law professor is most likely to test for. This applies to the bar examiners, and the MBE portion. Looking at this will alert you to possible issues so you do not miss any, and it will also help so that you know the possible tricks you may be given.

Second thing I did was bargraders.com. They really, really made a difference. It's expensive, but better to pay than to spend an eternity studying for the bar exam. They grade your essay. And they grade hard. But they push you. It's great!

Third thing I did was to buy motivational tapes. And make outlines, but make them in tiny font, so that you don't get lost in the trees.

And I worked at the same time I studied. And I passed. Hope this helps.

So,

Anonymous said...

You need a lot more specific plan than that. You need a study plan that says what you do every day, then stick to it no matter what. Divide it up by subjects, then by MBEs and essays... and STICK TO THE PLAN.

Also, no reading outlines for reading's sake. If you need to look something up, then fine, but no browsing - they aren't novels!

And dump that stupid computer and just write - computers cost you time on peripheral issues, you need to score points, use a book and pen.

Just a perspective.

Anonymous said...

Poobah-

Not sure if you have used this book in the past, but I want to recommend "The Bar Code" by Whitney Roberts.

It essentially has a suggested layout as to how you would attack any given essay question. It saves you a bunch of time in terms of organizing your answer, and is a great supplement to your other prep materials.

I'd take a look at it and see if it could help.

Get em this time! I'm pulling for ya.

-CUBuff

Anonymous said...

GP, I could really use some advice on tutors. I emailed you at your gmail account. Desperate, RR

Anonymous said...

I would greatly appreaciate it if anyone can give me some advice as to whether I have enough time to adequately prepare and pass the cal bar exam? I am planning on starting to study on Jan 2nd, 2011. I had to take some time off in order to recover from an illness that almost took my life a couple years ago. I know all of you are studying so thanks in advance for taking the time to help me. GOOD LUCK TO EVERYONE!

Anonymous said...

@ 12:04 AM. Yes, if you take it seriously from here on out. I passed the California bar on my first try with 2.5 weeks of full-time study. Before that period of full-time study, I put in six weeks in which I studied two to four hours a day after work and Barbri. The bar exam is a minimal test of competence; reasonable diligence for a few weeks before the test suffices to pass it.

Anonymous said...

Yes you can but it will take hard work.. I know someone who just passed the July Exam on the first try...She had already passes last year for another State.
Her Firm has many offices and asked her to sit the July Exam..
She had to scramble & get all the information & requirements before the final deadline....
She worked & studied in the evenings & all weekends...The Firm
gave her from 8 th July to study that was about 2 weeks 2 days..Everyone respected her study time... She never came up for air until she completed the exam ...AND She DID pass on the first try...
I believe youth is on her side ..She is only 26 years old...

Anonymous said...

THANK YOU both very much for your responses on "whether 7 weeks is enough study time for the cal bar".
I hate to ask the question again, but I wanted to point out the reasoning behind my worry that 7 weeks just might not be enough prep time.
The reason Im freaking out is b/c the review course I am taking advises 10 weeks to prepare. Im nervous b/c Im 3 weeks behind on my course schedule b/c I had to work until now, and Im just starting to study today.
Given that 10 weeks is the amount of time I am hearing from many different people, as well as my own review course(which is a very good course),... IS 7 WEEKS REALLY ENOUGH TIME TO ADEQUATELY PREPARE FOR THE CAL BAR EXAM WHEN MOST PEOPLE ARE TELLING ME 10 WEEKS?
Thanks again to all of you helping me. You truly are good people & I sincerely wish you the best!

Anonymous said...

THANK YOU both very much for your responses on "whether 7 weeks is enough study time for the cal bar".
I hate to ask the question again, but I wanted to point out the reasoning behind my worry that 7 weeks just might not be enough prep time.
The reason Im freaking out is b/c the review course I am taking advises 10 weeks to prepare. Im nervous b/c Im 3 weeks behind on my course schedule b/c I had to work until now, and Im just starting to study today.
Given that 10 weeks is the amount of time I am hearing from many different people, as well as my own review course(which is a very good course),... IS 7 WEEKS REALLY ENOUGH TIME TO ADEQUATELY PREPARE FOR THE CAL BAR EXAM WHEN MOST PEOPLE ARE TELLING ME 10 WEEKS?
Thanks again to all of you helping me. You truly are good people & I sincerely wish you the best!

Anonymous said...

@ 6:15: the reason is that review courses all err on the side of recommending overpreparation. They don't want to be blamed if their students are underprepared and don't pass. Similarly, if the people you are speaking to took ten weeks to prepare for the bar, they are going to tell you to do the same, because they will feel that they "needed" every week they put in. Everyone feels that way, no matter how much or how little they did. They can't imagine doing much less and still passing. But no one really knows since none of us passers know our scores.

Anyway, you ARE studying for the bar now, and you ARE planning to take it. So que sera, sera. Give it your best shot and see what happens. If your question is whether some people have passed in seven weeks, the answer is assuredly yes. If your question is whether YOU can pass in seven weeks, the answer is up to you.

Pammie said...

Grant Poobah,

Good luck to you Sir - I'm here if you want to correspond. I do think there is an art to the Performance Tests. I'll happily look over yours if you wish, to renew my offer. Warm regards, Pam

P.S. I can't wait til you pass:)

Anonymous said...

You'll pass this time- It's Your Turn

Although you won't know your score, it will be above 1440.

There will be a PR Mixed with Business Associations/Agency

Other essays definite- Evidence (both F/St),
Civil Procedure

You'll have at least one more essay dealin' with Real Prop

Can't see the rest but:

You'll do very well on the MBE's, as you have in your best years

That leaves 2 PTs
You'll be fine- with one of them scorin' above 70, maybe 80

I see you takin' the oath later this year!

Jonathan L. Kramer, Esq. said...

Stopping by to say hi! Thinking good thoughts about you.

jlk

Anonymous said...

Hi guys just stopping by to say a quick hello...I am thinking of you all...

I know that you are all under stress so take your B vitamins and also eat a potato.(Baked is nice)There is a compound in potatoes that mimics "Prozac" I am not
saying that you need Prozac but that feeling of well being after eating some "meat & potatoes" comes to mind..

Next...Take time off from studying to ...Stand up...Go up on your toes..then flat again..Do that 10 times. & go back to studying..The brain likes that.

BIG Big Hugs...

Anonymous said...

You need to have a specific plan of attack using one review company and back it up with a supplement of another-one that is designed to be less strenuous. For example, you could do a kaplan program and then supplement it in the last month with Tony's attack sheets or you could do a BarBri course/ BeatTheBar supplement. This is what I found worked for myself and most of my friends who took and passed the bar in july.

Samantha said...

Agreed....I personally prefer the BarBri/attack sheet combo however as they supplement eachother well. In particular, I found that the criminal law and tort law attack sheets were good supplements to the BarBri class I took. Do something like this and you'll be totally fine for the mbe.

Anonymous said...

Kaplan/BarBri all the same shit...the important thing is that you have a clear MAIN plan of attack and a supplement resource just in case.

Drew G said...

Hey there

I have a quick question for the pp anonymous who posted the comment pasted below:

"You need to have a specific plan of attack using one review company and back it up with a supplement of another-one that is designed to be less strenuous. For example, you could do a kaplan program and then supplement it in the last month with Tony's attack sheets or you could do a BarBri course/ BeatTheBar supplement. This is what I found worked for myself and most of my friends who took and passed the bar in july."

You wouldn't be able to do well on the bar just simply from taking one of the premier prep courses, without any need for supplementation? I have friends who said that their BarBri review course was more than enough for passing the MBE.

Best,

Drew